Policies

1. D2L Course Access Policies

Access policies for instructors, students, support staff and D2L Administrators.

 

D2L Instructor/Teaching Team Access Policy

Instructors will have access to a D2L course site only if the course's offering department has listed them as a Primary Instructor in UAccess. Instructors must still request a D2L course site as D2L course sites are only built upon request. Once the request has been submitted and the D2L course site has been created, all people listed in UAccess as Primary Instructors for that course will be automatically added to the D2L course site with Instructor access.

If additional members of the Teaching Team require access to a D2L course site, they will need to be manually added by someone that currently has Instructor access to that site. Anyone with Instructor access has the appropriate permissions to manually add someone to a D2L course site.

All Instructors and Teaching Team members will be automatically unenrolled from a D2L course site approximately two years after the end date of the course. This is in compliance with D2L's Purge Policy.


D2L Student Access Policy

Only students that are officially registered for a section that is connected to a D2L course site will be added to that D2L course site with the role of Student. Student enrollments are updated at scheduled intervals throughout the day; D2L enrollments are NOT real time.

On a case-by-case basis, requests from Instructors for manual enrollment of students in a D2L course site will be considered only for:

  • Groups conducting work that is not associated with credit-bearing courses
  • Students finishing work in a current D2L course site to satisfy the requirements for an Incomplete grade earned during their prior enrollment in the course.

D2L course sites are made active to students one week before a semester/session starts and inactive five weeks into the next regular semester. This means that student access to Fall and Winter D2L course sites will be removed after the 5th week of the Spring semester. Access to Spring and Summer D2L course sites will be removed after the 5th week of the Fall semester. This timeline is in compliance with the Grade Appeal Policy as outlined by the UA Registrar's Office.


Additional D2L Course Site Access

The following groups of people have access to D2L course sites, but they do not appear in any Classlist. Their access is automatic and does not require Instructor approval.

  • D2L Administrators: Members of the D2L Support Team are able to access and edit ALL D2L course sites. They do not intervene in a course unless specifically requested by a member of the Teaching Team.
  • OIA's Online Instructional Consultants and the Office of Digital Learning (ODL) Instructional Designers : The OIA's Consultants as well as ODL Instructional designers have access and can edit ALL D2L course sites.  They do not intervene in a course unless they are specifically working with an instructor on a course.
  • Disability Resource Center (DRC) Staff: Members of the DRC Staff have access to D2L course sites that have one or more students registered for document conversion accomodations.
  • Department Administrators: Certain departments on campus have staff members who help faculty maintain their course sites. Their abilities to access and edit the course sites within their departments may vary.

 

Last Updated: September 2015

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2. D2L Purge Policy

Learn how long D2l course sites remain accessible after a term is over.

All D2L course sites will be accessible by the instructional team for 10 years or for as long as the University of Arizona has an active contract with D2L.

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3. University of Arizona Policies

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4. Copyright Information for Lecture Notes

Memo from the Office of the General Counsel regarding copyright on lecture notes

MEMORANDUM
 
OFFICE OF THE GENERAL COUNSEL
 Administration Building, Room 103
 Tucson, Arizona 85721
 Telephone 621-3175 ● Fax 621-9001
 
Date: March 7, 2012
 
To: Deans
 
From: B. Glenn George
 Vice President for Legal Affairs and General Counsel

Re: Faculty Ownership Rights in Lecture Notes and Course Materials
 
I am writing in response to concerns expressed about the practice of students selling notes of classroom lectures (or other course materials) to other students or to third parties for resale to other students. Please feel free to distribute this information to your faculty as you deem appropriate.
 
Under the Section D(6)(a) of the University’s Intellectual Property Policy (available at http://www.ott.arizona.edu/uploads/ip_policy.pdf), “course notes” and other original course material created by faculty are considered intellectual property owned by the faculty member. Consequently, if a student sells this material without the faculty member’s permission, the student has improperly infringed on that faculty member’s property rights. Outlined below is a three-step process for determining and establishing a faculty member’s copyright interest in lectures and course materials, notifying students of that interest, and taking remedial action against infringers.
 
Step One – Fix Your Work Product in a Tangible Medium
 
In order to obtain copyright protection for your lectures and course materials, your work must be: 1) original, and 2) reduced to a tangible medium. A work is “original” if it displays a certain degree of creativity. Therefore, a mere compilation of materials already in the public domain is not original unless arranged or analyzed in a manner that demonstrates creativity. A work can be reduced to “tangible medium” by way of writing or through other electronic or audio-visual means. Thus, if you prepare a written outline of original work from which you deliver a lecture or audio record your lecture, the lecture itself may be eligible for copyright protection even if not read verbatim from the outline. You can further protect your copyright interest by printing the word “copyright “on your materials or displaying the symbol © in a prominent place, together with your name and the year this work was first published or distributed. (Note, however, that you have a copyright interest in these original works even without using the term “copyright” or the copyright symbol. Using these labels simply provides better notice to potential infringers of your rights.)
 
Step Two – Notify Students of Your Copyright
 
You should consider including a statement in your course syllabus or online course policies that: 1) you hold the copyright in your lectures and course materials, 2) your copyright includes student notes or summaries that substantially reflect your lectures or materials, 3) these materials are made available only for personal use by students, and 4) students may not distribute or reproduce the materials for commercial purposes without your express written consent. (This would not prevent students from sharing notes on an individual basis for personal use, and you may want to include a statement to that effect.) Finally, you can advise students that violation of your copyright may result in course sanctions and violate the Code of Academic Integrity.
 
Step Three – Notifying and Taking Action Against Infringers

Because you own the copyright in your original lectures and course materials once reduced to a tangible medium (see generally Arizona Board of Regents Policy 6-908), it is up to you to notify infringers of your ownership rights and take remedial measures. The University cannot do so on your behalf. Many of the established commercial note-taking services post instructions on their websites so that you can notify them of copyright violations and demand that they “take down” offending materials (see, for example, http://www.notehall.com/index/termsandconditions). For your convenience, I have attached a sample “cease and desist” letter that you may send to a person or entity who may be infringing on your copyrighted materials.
 
Hopefully, this memo addresses most of your questions and concerns. Please feel free to contact me (bggeorge@email.arizona.edu / 621-5150) or Josh Estavillo (jle1@email.arizona.edu / 626-7001) if we can be of any further assistance.
 
BGG:mdf
 cc Vice Provost Gail Burd


 
SAMPLE NOTIFCATION LETTER:
 
Date:
 
Dear___________
 
It has recently come to my attention that [you/your company] is selling and/or distributing publicly course materials for which I own the exclusive copyrights. These materials include: [describe materials being infringed—e.g. verbatim copies of PowerPoint presentations; copies of my lecture notes, recordings of my lectures, class handouts, student notes that are taken directly from my lecture notes, etc.]. I am both the instructor for the course and the author of the copyrighted materials described above. Therefore, I demand that you immediately cease and desist from selling, distributing, and/or reproducing these materials.

As sole owner of the copyright in the works/materials detailed above, I hold the exclusive right to reproduce, distribute, publish, modify, and/or license these materials. I have not authorized [you/your company] to reproduce, distribute, publish, or sell any of my materials, in whole or in part, and you have no lawful right to do so.

Therefore, I demand that you immediately: [draft applicable demands, see below for examples]
 1. Remove all notes for [name course for which materials are being posted/sold] from your list of available course materials.
 2. Destroy any and all copies (hardcopy and electronic) of [describe materials].
 Please notify me in writing, no less than [insert time period—e.g. 14 days] that you have complied with my requests.

Nothing herein shall be constituted as a waiver of any of my rights or remedies, at law and in equity, all of which I expressly reserve.

_______________________
 Name and Signature

 

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5. Prevention of Sale of Class Notes

Instructions on how to prevent students selling class notes posted in D2L

If you have been frustrated by students using D2L's Classlist to advertise class notes through sites like studysoup.com or notehall.com then please consider the following options:

  1. Remove the Classlist tool from your course site. This has the downside of preventing students emailing you and other students from within D2L, but your email address is likely in your Syllabus and they can still send from regular university email. If you do remove it then you can still go to Course Admin and Classlist to email all of your students.
    • If you have never edited a D2L Nav Bar then the easiest way to do this is to go to Course Admin, Navigation and Themes, use the drop down menu to choose "Default Course Home With No Classlist," and click Apply.
    • Please keep in mind a student could still "guess" the Classlist url. To prevent this you will need to go to Course Admin, Tools, and make Classlist Inactive. Doing this also means you will be unable to use Classlist. When you want to use it you must return to Tools and toggle Classlist Active. When done using Classlist you then must return to Tools and make it Inactive again.

2. Consider adding a statement to your syllabus warning students of the repercussions of using a site to sell class notes:

"Selling class notes and/or other course materials to other students or to a third party for resale is not permitted without the instructor’s express written consent. Providing student email addresses to a third party is not permitted. Violations to this and other course rules are subject to the Code of Academic Integrity and may result in course sanctions. Additionally, students who use D2L or UA email to sell or buy these copyrighted materials are subject to Code of Conduct Violations for misuse of electronic resources provided by The University of Arizona. This conduct may also constitute copyright infringement."

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6. Copyright Considerations for Streaming Video

Copyright issues to be aware of if you are streaming content you did not create

 

Copyright Considerations for Streaming Video in UA Courses

If you plan to include content or materials within your videos other than content or materials that you have created yourself (“Third Party Content”), be aware that there are potential copyright issues related to such Third Party Content.  Specifically, a third party may own the copyright in the Third Party Content that you desire to use – even content and material pulled from the internet or other public venues may be copyrighted – so you want to make sure that you are respectful of the Third Party Content owner’s rights. 

Generally, it is likely considered to be “fair use” to make appropriately tailored Third Party Content available to enrolled students via digital networks. 

This is specifically covered in the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries:

 http://www.arl.org/storage/documents/publications/code-of-best-practices-fair-use.pdf

Of course, this leaves us asking what “appropriately tailored” means in this context. The following are some considerations that would support a finding of fair use when streaming video that includes Third Party Content for instructional purposes: 

  • Make use of a legally acquired copy
    At best, this would involve linking to an appropriately licensed copy. Alternatively, if you can’t locate such a service and are required to work from a physical copy, be sure this is a legal copy.
  • Limit access to those enrolled in the course
    Only eligible students (as well as the instructor and any teaching assistants) should have access to the material.
  • Limit the time the work is accessible
    The material should be made available only as long as needed to meet the instructional goals. This might be the end of a section of the course, or at the end of the semester at the latest.
  • Limit the amount of the work used
    The material used should be directly tied to the instructor’s pedagogical purpose, and only the portion of the work needed should be used.
  • Limit further re-use
    Reasonable measures should be taken to prevent or deter viewers’ ability to make this copy available outside the course site. This could include a clear statement that the work is protected by copyright and made available for the research and instruction.

 

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